This website uses cookies. By using the services of this website you consent to the usage of cookies.
OK
 

Motorcycles 1:6

1:6 Motorcycle Honda DAX Kit

SKU: 300016002

Article number: 300016002 Product: 1:6 Motorcycle Honda DAX Kit

Tamiya is pleased to announce the re-issue of this classic model from our big-scale 1/6 motorcycle series. It depicts the Dax Honda Export 70 (also known as the Trail 70), the bike with a unique dachshund-esque tubular section in its T-bone main frame. Small-diameter wheels kept the center of gravity low for great maneuverability and stability. Its 4-stroke OHC engine was based upon that of the legendary Super Cub series, and was paired with a centrifugal clutch and 3-speed transmission.

About the Model

• This is a 1/6 scale plastic model assembly kit. Length: 250mm.
• The T-bone frame is depicted with accuracy, complete with internal gas tank and battery case.
• Features sprung folding main stand and brake pedal.
• Semi-pneumatic tires are given a realistic tread pattern, and have Bridgestone lettering.
• Features a removable front fork section and folding handlebars, just like those on the real bike.
• Rear seat is opened via a lever on the model.
• OHC engine is recreated in great detail, including depictions of cooling fins.
• With authentic metal plated matte wheels, and gloss components for muffler, handlebars, fenders and more.
• Rubber tubing is included to recreate the various pipes and lines on the bike.
• Comes with high quality Cartograf decals.
• Includes an updated version of the original Japanese/English assembly instruction manual.

 

Warning! Not suitable for children under 14 years.

1:6 Honda Gorilla Spring Collection

SKU: 300016031

Article number: 300016031 Product: 1/6 Honda Gorilla Spring Collection

About the Honda Gorilla Spring Collection

In 1967, Honda pioneered the field of "leisure motorcycles" with the release of the Monkey. That charming machine was equipped with tiny five-inch tires, a rigid suspension, and unique folding handlebars, which enabled its loading into a passenger car. The uniqueness of the Monkey made it an instant hit among the young and young at heart. Over the years, the little Monkey continued to mature, undergoing several modifications including the incorporation of eight inch tires and an improved suspension system. In August 1978, Honda released the big brother of the Monkey, and appropriately named it "Gorilla".

Save the gas tank and seat, the Gorilla adopted fundamentally the same parts as the Monkey. The most defining aspect of the Gorilla is its swelled chest, an oversized gas tank, which boasts a capacity of 9 liters. And while the Monkey was equipped with folding handlebars, the Gorilla got fixed ones. The main reason was that while the Monkey was designed to be loaded into a car and transported to the riding area, the Gorilla was made to get there on its own power. And as the Monkey was to be loaded, the Gorilla was designed to load, equipped with two large baggage carriers, one on the front and one on the rear. The 9 liter gas tank and superb 70km per liter mileage provided a maximum continuous running distance of 630km, on par with most passenger cars of the same era. Its powerplant was the same as the monkey, a 49cc aircooled single cylinder SOHC engine, which was also used on Honda's best selling Super Cub. The Gorilla was also equipped with a manuel 4-speed transmission, opposed to the automatic 3-speed system of the Monkey.

Like its little brother, the Gorilla underwent various improvements until 1992, when production was ceased. The popularity of the machine, however, did not dwindle, with the few remaining used Gorillas fetching premium prices. It was February 1998 when Ho
 

1:6 Suzuki GSX1100S Katana 1980

SKU: 300016025

Article number: 300016025 Product: 1:6 Suzuki GSX1100S Katana 1980

One of the most famous motorcycle shows in the world, is held every two years in Cologne West Germany, and the 1980 show is sure to stand out as one of the most unforgettable. One reason was that Honda released their CX500 turbo for the first time, and the second is that Suzuki"s GSX1100S "Katana" (Japanese for sword) was unveiled. The Honda CX500 attracted attention for its advanced engine techniques and the Katana for its advanced and aggressive body styling, which broke from common traditional motorcycle styling. Although the Katana GSX1100S styling impressed the many thousands of viewers, almost everybody thought that it was just for show and the production model would be quite different. During the summer of 1981, Suzuki released the production Katana with almost exactly the same body styling seen at the Cologne show, with subtle improvements in the engine and running gear. The body styling is from the genius of Mr. Hans A. Muth of West Germany, who spent much time ensuring driver comfort in his design, and which proved out in many wind tunnel tests. The entire styling was derived from research on the best drivers position, and the rearward placed backsteps and unique tank styling were not done just for the pleasing jet age appearance. Large capacity fuel tank and small fairing were blended together for the best airflow around the rider and the bike. Although the bike is most noticable for its styling, every part in it is quality. Engine is an air-cooled, parallel 4 of 1075cc, using 16 valves. With the unique Suzuki TSCC (Twin Swirl Combustion Chamber) in the engine, it puts out 111 hp. This tremendous power transmits into a road speed of 230 k/h and its unique body styling deeps it stable even at these high speeds. Suzuki is shipping a 1000cc Katana GSX1000S tot he American market, and also a 750cc version to the European market as well. Requests from Japanese enthusiasts prompted Suzuki to also market a 750cc Katana GSX750S to their market
 

1:6 Honda CB750F 1979

SKU: 300016020

Article number: 300016020 Product: 1/6 Honda CB750F 1979

About the Honda CB750F

The Honda CB750F Motorcycle first appeared on the Japanese market in June 1979 and was shortly the best seller in the 750 motorcycle class. Just ten years prior to their CB750F, Honda opened the field of multi-cylinder, large-bore bikes with the now famous four cylinder CB750. Honda had extensively tested the multi-cylinder concept and won several Grand Prix motorcycle races, and the CB750 was based upon these experiences. The engines worked flawlessly and provided very smooth power with almost no vibration, and so shocked the industry, that soon many of the famous makers also produced four cylinder large cubic motorcycles. Honda, of course, held the number one position in sales for many years, but then Kawasaki released their "Z" series DOHC 750 bikes, and took over the number one position, relegating Honda to 2nd place. Honda, however, did not take this set back for long, and continued to improve their engines, and in 1979 released a CB 750K DOHC with four valves per cylinder, a powerful 68hp, and completely new body styling. It was not long before Honda was again number one! The CB750F, released in June 1979 was styled after the very popular European Honda CB900F, which had been copied from their racing RCB bike. This styling was new to stock motorcycles of the world. The low positioned handle bars and rear positioned foot rests, allow a "slouched" riding position and this style is what set the standard for the eighties.

The CB750F is powered by a 4 cylinder DOHC 748cc engine with 4 valves per cylinder, and the 1981 version produces 70 brake horsepower. The bike has a double cradle frame of welded steel tubing, 37mm air front forks with equalizer and 30 way adjustable rear shocks with variable hydraulic dampening. It is equipped with a maintenance-free transistorized pointless inductive ignition system and braking is accomplished with a dual caliper double disc front brake and a large single disc at the rear. A newly

to the top